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Turning A Blind Eye For The Movement

A couple of days ago I saw a post on the Vegan Bros Facebook page that instantly stirred up feelings of anger, frustration and disappointment. It was simply captioned, “Everyone’s going vegan.”

Normally I am totally on board with the crazy, over the edge stuff that Matt and Phil promote. When a celeb goes vegan they lose their ever-loving minds. I understand why, that person has a huge following and fans so it helps to popularize veganism and expose it to folks who maybe just fluffed it off.

Am I fan of Kylie Jenner? Nope, but what she does is her own thing. Miley? Yeah I’m not a fan of hers either so her announcement that she went vegan didn’t elucidate more than just a “yippee” from me. Over time though, I give her credit, it hasn’t been just a celebrity fad thing for her and she seems to be really passionate about it. Don’t get me wrong about celebrity veganism, it’s great; absolutely great!! Again it raises the presence of the movement into the public realm and you can’t buy that type of advertising. But when does it go to far?

But when a character like Adrian Peterson talks about becoming an 80/20 vegan (because he can’t drive by a Church’s Chicken without falling off the wagon); I cringe. I cringe because this man, just a short time ago, perpetuated violent behavior toward his own son. These are graphic photos, but if you have not seen them CLICK HERE for proof of what a monster he is. I commented on the Vegan Bros thread about this and got this response from another person who follows them:

My comment was cut short, I forgot to expand it before grabbing the screenshot from my phone. I actually went back a few minutes ago to get a better screenshot but it seems my comment has been deleted. When I said up above I was disappointed, this is the reason. Rather than take down the post about this piece of sh*t child abuser, they took my post off.

Part of what I had said in my comment that isn’t shown is, what if Michael Vick all of a sudden went vegan? Would the community just forget what he did because now he has a voice for animals? I don’t think so. Everyone would lose their minds and condemn him. But somehow it’s ok for Adrian Peterson to beat his child and then be held up on a pedestal because he all of a sudden went vegan, but still eats chicken.

**eyeroll**

“He’s trying!”

**eyeroll**

Yeah, I hear you.

But I cannot, and will not get behind this man monster. I apologize for all the profanity, but this really, REALLY burnt my ass and I felt that I needed to get it off my chest.

Am I wrong here?

When do we stop making excuses for people just because they are vegan?

Daiya Sells Out; The Day Vegans Became Unhinged

I have to admit, reading  news about Daiya being purchased by a pharmaceutical company (Otsuka) nearly had me foaming at the mouth. I was outraged. I felt like they had let me down and the whole vegan movement, they sold the f*ck out and I was so f*cking pissed off.

I watched the announcement online, as most folks did. You can watch the video below to see what the founders had to say.

Again, I was angry after watching that. I felt like they were being greedy d*ckheads who only cared about one thing, money. With all the other companies selling to larger corporations, it honestly didn’t come as a huge surprise.

Beyond Meat received investment capital from Tyson Foods.

Gardein was acquired by Pinnacle Foods.

Vega, So Delicious and Silk are owned by Danone.

Maple Leaf Foods recently bought Lightlife.

Unilever owns Ben & Jerrys and Breyers who have finally offered vegan ice creams.

I could go on for a bit, but I wanted to make a couple of points instead that could make all of this more positive than it is negative. The fact of the matter is; sometimes money talks. If a brand like Daiya is looking to expand but doesn’t have the money to do so, having an offer on the table to be able to grow and hit new markets is a must— especially if the right deal is struck and you get to maintain the ability to oversee how the company is run and have a say in its future. That’s pretty much what happened here.

We’ve all loved Daiya for years. They were the talk of the town at some recent expos and their new products are going to blow people away. Besides cheese they also have cheesecake, yogurt, salad dressings, cream cheese and mac & cheese. They’ve tweaked a bunch of the recipes over the past year and will be releasing them soon.

Back to the video and announcement. I was angry that I wouldn’t be able to try these products because Daiya had aligned with a company that is known to test its products on animals. Yes, Otsuka are big, huge, GIANT pieces of sh*t, there is no way of getting around it. It was hard to sit with this and try to rationalize why the acquisition could be a good thing. I came up with this reason and maybe a couple more.

It is quite possible that they (Otsuka) are legitimately trying to get out of the whole animal testing thing and are going more toward a plant-based business model; that seems to be what the Daiya guys think and I believe them to be stand up guys. They didn’t do this for the past (almost) 10 years to just throw up their hands and say f*ck it. These are passionate guys and you can tell in the video. You can also tell in their responses to all the posts on social media. While those same comments are canned, they are consistent in what they believe.

We got to look at this a different way and think that it might just help the movement. Daiya will be distributed all over the place now, imagine all those people who are going to get turned onto it and drop dairy. I know more than a few people who still have yet to make the final jump to full vegan and that’s because of cheese. Ya I know… But still, this move could be huge for them, especially if the new formula is as good as they say it is.

The fact of the matter is that we can’t jump off the proverbial bridge every time something like this happens. We can’t just yell “BOYCOTT” or hop over to change.org and get a petition going; that seems childish. It’s not always as black and white as it seems and may very well be a blessing in disguise. I will admit, for a few days I switched my cheese brand from Daiya to Go Veggie (it’s all my local market had).

I plan to go back to Daiya though because I like the product.

I plan to go back to Daiya because Otsuka needs to see that vegan foods are a growing market and they should get out of the animal abuse game. As I said before, money talks. If they see the growth they will invest more. If we take our toys and run away like children then Daiya fails and Otuska (and other investors) see the movement as a fad and move on.

I plan to go back to Daiya because I believe in what they think they are doing. I don’t own the business and I can’t tell them how to run theirs. If they believe this will help others than I am all for it.

Do what you want to do, I can’t tell you what to believe or think. I can tell you what I think and that’s now been said.

I’m interested in your civil comments, please let me know what your thought are now that there’s been a few days for this all to sink in.

Precious Metal; Republished and Repurposed

This past weekend, my two boys and I went camping with some of the Strong Hearts Vegan Power crew. One night, I was talking with Sam Hartman (SHVP team member and keyboardist for Anagnorisis) about music and stuff and it reminded me of an old article I had written showing the parallels of heavy/ death metal and Buddhism. I’m not sure how many of you knew this, but from 2000-2008-ish I was one of the founders and vocalist for a death metal band called Leukorrhea. The last recorded album I was involved with was titled “Breeding Salvation.” we had done a full length previous to that as well as a split CD that was released in Japan and one that was released in Italy. We also did had songs on a variety of compilation cd’s including one in rememberance of Chuck Schuldiner of the band Death.

Anyway, I dug for the article and with the help of my old friend Rod Meade Sperry (editor of Lion’s Roar Magazine) and I wanted to share it with you as I feel myself being pulled back to a life filled with mindful behavior and intention. Of course, being vegan you would think that it would come naturally. Of course it does when making food choices, but in making other decisions I find myself just existing to co-exist. I hope this article gives you some enjoyment, it is long so please bare with it; I promise it’s a fun story.

© Precious Metal (not to be used without permission)
© Precious Metal

WHAT COULD BUDDHISM HAVE TO DO WITH HEAVY METAL? If you’re not into metal, I guess the answer would be “nothing.” But if you’re me, the answer would have to be “everything.”

In 1983, at the age of 9, I went into a local department store. This was way before CDs, iPods, MP3 players, etc. (Now that I’ve completely dated myself.) I was perusing the music section and a cassette jumped out at me: it was Ozzy Osbourne’s Bark At The Moon. I took it home and was hooked. I knew right away that someday, somehow, I had to be involved with this music.

As things went on I was exposed to more bands. In 1985 I got Metallica’s Master Of Puppets and the metal bar had been raised. Next was Slayer’s Reign in Blood and it was all over: I had to have metal at all costs. I know the Buddha taught about attachment and how we should try to rid ourselves of it, but I had no idea about that then, and was immersed so deep I never wanted to come out. I still haven’t.

Over the years friends showed me stuff from bands like Megadeth, Death Angel, Death, Napalm Death, Rigor Mortis, Sanctuary, Morbid Angel, and on and on. We’d go into music stores, allowance in hand, and try to find the nastiest, grossest album-cover art we could find. One of us found Carcass’s Reek of Putrefaction, and we were in disbelief; what was this stuff, and how could anyone listen to it? But after hearing it over and over it grew on us — like a gangrenous infection. We would stay up late and watch Headbangers Ball on MTV (this was back when it was good), and soon we all picked up instruments and started learning Metallica songs and anything else we could get tablature for.

Ever since that first day I heard Ozzy, I knew I had to be in a band, and in my 20’s I did just that. We cranked out some songs, put out a demo and almost immediately a small label wanted to finance our first disc. How awesome was this, right? Our first CD got some decent reviews and people started writing letters and e-mails to us. (Yes, the internet had been invented by then). We were offered the opportunity to tour, and it was in Detroit, Michigan, that I realized my goal had been achieved: we were playing the I-Rock Cafe and on the wall was a picture of Ozzy standing in the same damn club, playing with Black Sabbath. I knew then and there that I could never give this up.
And while this was all well and good, it still felt like something was missing. I was entering my 30’s and reality had hit.

WHAT WAS IT I WAS LOOKING FOR, THOUGH? I have a wonderful wife and two great kids. I had a hobby that made me happy, a job that was going well. Still, we were just barely able to make ends meet, so we moved from Massachusetts (where I’d lived all my life) to Knoxville, Tennessee, where the cost of living was relatively low. We got settled in, found jobs and decent day-care, and really enjoyed Knoxville.

I worked during the day and my wife worked at night. I hadn’t met many people in Knoxville, so after my son was in bed for the night, I’d spend a lot of time on the internet. I honestly don’t know how it happened, but I got onto a Buddhist web-forum and started reading posts and checking out websites. One thing that kept coming up was karma: I knew that if you acted like a jerk you would get negativity back, and the same went for good deeds coming back as positivity. My interest was peaked and I started reading a lot more. It all felt right to me, like the part that was missing was filling up.

I started buying up books, reading them almost as quickly as it took me to pay for them and bring them home. One of the members of the forum mentioned a book by Thubten Chodron called Buddhism for Beginners. I went out and got it, and it helped me out so much. Rather than just being a book of plain text, it was in a Q&A format, and a lot of the questions were the same ones I’d started asking myself.

The big question was, What is the basic idea behind this thing called Buddhism? I learned that the answer was found in things that were easy to do: be a good person, don’t harm others, and be a help whenever possible. This was one of the simplest things I could hear, but also one of the most profound. There was no dogma, no over-zealous hypocrisy; just plain and simple guidelines on how to live a better life for myself and for everyone else around me. I read some more books and started getting into meditation. Almost immediately I started noticing changes. One of the biggest was that I could stay calm now when something major was affecting my life.

Eventually, the wife and I started to miss being with our family and friends. The hardest thing for me was that my daughter was still living in MA and we were in Tennessee. She had stayed when we moved because her mother (my first wife), understandably, didn’t want her to switch schools. We had worked out that I would get her on vacations and stuff, but that was harder than anticipated. It was difficult coming up with airfare, especially while still paying for food, rent, car payments, etc. We spoke often, and I sent her gifts via FedEx (that’s where I was working) but it just wasn’t the same. I was beginning to get discouraged about the whole move-thing. After my wife’s mother visited, bringing my daughter with her, we all decided that we had to do what we could and go back to MA so we could all be together.

All this time I was still learning as much as I could about Buddhism, reading books like a madman and absorbing the teachings as best I could. But I was running into issues here and there, and there seemed to be no one else into Buddhism where I was. Hell, I was in the Bible Belt of the US — where was I going to find another Buddhist? I started seeking out temples and centers but they were all over two hours away. So I kept seeking my answers online. The people on the forum I mentioned were helping me out more than they know.

One day as I was leaving work, I pulled out of my parking spot. By the time I had put it in gear to go forward, another car was already coming at me in reverse. I slammed on the horn hoping they would hear me, but they were either occupied with something else or not hearing me because their music was way too loud. (The bass was slamming me in the chest, it was so loud). I heard a crunch. We had an accident on our hands.

Normally I would have gone berserk, cursing and yelling (maybe even frothing at the mouth a little), but not this time. I took a deep breath, got out of the car and assessed the damage: the other car was more hurt than mine, which had just a couple scratches. I asked the woman who was driving if she was ok. She was, but she seemed astounded at my reaction, as if she was expecting the reaction of an insane person. I was aware, though, that acting that way would probably just elevate the situation to one neither of us would want to deal with. I attribute this to nothing else but the things I was learning about Buddhism and mindfulness. There were of course plenty of other events that “tested” what I was learning. But my ability to change seemed real.

THE FUNNY THING ABOUT BUDDHISM AND METAL is how, in my life, one’s taught me about the other. Being a metalhead I’ve heard more than my share of songs about death, pain, misery, etc. How can I draw a parallel with Buddhism, you ask? I can do it in one word: impermanence! Buddhism teaches how to cope with things like death by reminding us that everything in life is impermanent — including life itself. Death is always around the corner. And we don’t have to be scared about it. We can embrace it by realizing that all beings, no matter who they are, will eventually expire. In this way, metal helped prime me for my path.

You might ask, though, how can I still be a metalhead, writing lyrics that maybe talk of harming another person, or consist of morbid horror stories, and also practice Buddhism. Some might even say I can’t do both at the same time, but I very strongly disagree. Just because I want to be a good person doesn’t mean I can’t listen to “Hammer Smashed Face” by Cannibal Corpse. Yeah, the lyrics are WAY over the top, but they’re just lyrics. It’s just a song, and if you can come to terms with reality and non-reality, I don’t think it’s an issue at all. Some might even pose a similar question to Richard Gere or other well-known celebrity-Buddhists: How can they, in a material world like Hollywood, overcome the very obstacles that Buddhism teaches about? And, look at Gere’s movie, “Pretty Woman.” It was about a rich and powerful real-estate guy and his “relationship” with a hooker. Yeah, there was more to it than that, and it actually was a good movie, but you would think a Buddhist couldn’t do a movie like that and still have some sort of clout, right? But look at what he does off-screen. He has taken teachings from many prominent lamas, including the Dalai Lama. He donates money to various causes, he’s a chairman on the International Campaign for Tibet, and that’s just some of the good things that he does. So why would being involved in metal music, if it doesn’t compromise one’s contributions, be any different?

My answer: it isn’t. If you’ve got the right mindset about it, nothing has to be a “bad” thing. I’ve written most of the lyrics to my band’s songs, and every now and again have strayed from just gore lyrics: I’ve written songs about the Iraq War and about the Catholic Church Scandal in Boston and the rest of the US. I’m concerned about real issues, big and small.

Still, people have this idea that metalheads couldn’t possibly do any good. I think differently about that. Even before starting my practice I liked to think of myself as a compassionate person, and thought the same of quite a number of metalheads around me. I’ve been to many shows that either donated the proceeds to a good cause like the Hurricane Katrina Fund, Autism Now, or other charities. I’ve seen many shows that were dedicated to people that had something to do with the metal scene over the years but who had passed on. We don’t take life and death nearly as lightly as some seem to think.

PERSONALLY, with Buddhism, I notice positive change, especially to the areas that need it, every day. Even in the seemingly-most mundane ways. Like, nowadays, I won’t be so quick to give you the finger; I’ll say hello back and smile without judging or thinking you’re a freak. Hell, I may be a freak to you, right? And I’m more apt now to pick up the sponge and just wash the dishes. My wife used to hate that about me — I was a lazy prick. But after reading a book by Thich Nhat Hanh, I realized that doing the dishes was a great time to just be with myself, and just do the dishes. To be able to slow down and just take time to be with my mind.

See, being a metalhead doesn’t make me a primitive thug with a one-track mindset. And it doesn’t mean I want to rip your head off cause I wrote that in my lyrics, or that I want to see your guts exposed on the sidewalk. It’s an art! Writing a song is very similar to writing a horror-movie script, just a lot shorter. And just because some may not understand it, it doesn’t mean it’s sick, or demented. One song idea I am working on has some potentially very gruesome overtones, and could easily be misunderstood — but I’ve been trying to steer clear of typical gore lyrics, and instead relate actual events. Example: in Tibet there is a form of burial called sky burial, or jhator (bya-gtor) in Tibetan. It’s actually not officially considered a “burial,” more a gift of alms to the vultures. Of course, Buddhists know that when we die the body is pretty much useless from then on out. So the Tibetans offer the corpse to the birds. A man comes in after the body is laid down and works to cut it up into several pieces. This sends the vultures into a feeding frenzy and, very quickly, the body disappears. And while this may seem somewhat normal to Buddhists who understand it, someone unfamiliar with this practice would probably be horrified by the whole process of sky burial.

Likewise, I hope people won’t jump to the conclusion that I’m a bad person (or a “bad Buddhist”!) for writing horror-inspired lyrics. Can I not practice compassion and kindness because I wrote a song that was based on Ted Bundy? Reality is scary sometimes — people die, people get killed by other people. The news reports it. Movies are made about it. Books are written about it. Lessons are learned from it sometimes, too. Just because my music is loud and my lyrics are over the top, does it mean I can’t feel love for all sentient beings?
I say, no; there doesn’t have to be a conflict of interest. It’s not hard being a good person and still living a subversive lifestyle. We can all be good people, no matter who we are. We can all have hobbies, or things that make us feel good without compromising the other important things in life.

I contend that being a metalhead helped me become a Buddhist. It took lots and lots of practice to achieve the things that our band did. And to achieve the things I want now, like a better life for all sentient beings — whether they are metalheads, punks, hip hoppers, goths, ravers (do they even exist anymore?), or just regular Joe Schmoes — that’s going to take practice, too.

That basically sums up Buddhism for me, it’s practice.

And as I get better at it, those around me will be better off as well.

ps. The image attached to this post is copy-written, I had it commissioned for my old blog and permission is needed to use anywhere other than here or on my old blog, Precious Metal.

Day in the Life; What I eat

I share recipes as often as I can. I even post what I pack for lunches during the work week. But what do I eat from the time I wake to the time I hit the hay? It can vary greatly but some things are staples.

Let’s go through a typical day…

BREAKFAST

I’m up anywhere between 5:30-6:30 each day, depends on how many times I hit the snooze button. Habitually I brew a pot of coffee and down a cup before it’s the other morning habit; oatmeal. It doesn’t matter what’s in it, I eat oatmeal every day! EVERY DAY! Depending on what the day has ahead I will up the calories with either hemp seeds, nuts or both! I try my best to make sure there is at least one fruit in it, whether that’s a banana, strawberries, blueberries or even raisins. Again, depending on the day ahead, my oatmeal can vary from 250-600 calories.

SNACKS

Before lunch I snack on at least two pieces of fruit, that’s usually a banana or whatever melon is in season. Right now I’m crushing cantaloupe like it’s going out of style! I may have some seeds too, all depends on whether I’m at work or not. Carrying around a ladder, and the weight of a tool-belt, I can burn calories and feel famished quickly. Maybe I will swap a fruit for some pistachios if I need the extra energy. If I’m home it’s just the two pieces of fruit.

After lunch I try to eat more fruit, or even some raw broccoli or carrots. Maybe I will dip the carrots in some hummus but I try not to add to much to them, they are perfect the way they are. I really enjoy Nature’s Bakery bars and will maybe devour a package of those. There are a couple in each package, the package says 1 bar is a serving but who the heck eats just one? Not this guy. I try not to do this to much but, when the sweet tooth is too strong, I love me some Breyers non-dairy Oreo Ice Cream. They’ve done great things with non-dairy ice cream and although I love it, the Ben And Jerry’s is nowhere as cost efficient.

LUNCH

Lunch is by and large pretty easy. If I’m working it’s usually one of my Mason Jar Creations which have three components: protein, clean carb and greens. That can be tempeh with rice and spinach. Maybe it’s chickpeas with quinoa and collard greens. Or even some jambalaya with chorizo and okra. You get the idea. At home my creativity is somewhat lacking if I’m just bumming around. I will usually eat something that is left over from the night before. That can be taco crumbles sprinkled on some greens, maybe some mashed potatoes (which I will add some butter and nooch) and make a meal out of that. I try to balance the best I can, leftovers are great though as I hate to toss out food. Sometimes if I’m feeling a little sluggish I will make a big salad and load it up with a variety of greens and keep it super simple.

DINNER

Being vegan is easy folks, as you can see so far, we don’t just eat nuts and berries. Yeah it sounds like it, but there is so much good food out there. I make my own seitan so sometimes I will make a homemade mac and cheese with seitan “ham” or “bacon” and asparagus. We eat tacos nearly every tuesday and we usually use Trader Joe’s beefless crumbles; they are hands down one of the best. Being from the northeast we love the flavors of Thanksgiving so we frequently have Gardein Turk’y Cutlets. My kids love breakfast for dinner so we will make pancakes and homefries. Other days we might just decided to take things easy and slap a Beyond Burger on the grill w/ some zucchini and summer squash.

You get the idea, right?

As the saying goes “anything you can eat I can eat vegan!”

Oh Look, It’s so Shiny!

Should we buy just because it’s new and Vegan?

How far will you go to get the new shiny Vegan food or product?

Is it worth making an hour (or more) drive to the nearest Target because you heard they finally got the birthday cake flavor of Just Cookie Dough. I mean, you drove there to pick up the chocolate chip so why not this flavor? You have to try it, right?

That’s how I felt about Beyond Meat’s Beyond Burger. It’s supposed to be the closest thing to a meat burger, obviously without the meat. For months I’ve seen friends and other Instagrammers posting pics of it and talking up how amazing it is.

I would check the retailer list once a week to see if my local Whole Foods was finally carrying it. 2-3 days ago they made the list and I immediately packed up and headed toward Hyannis to get a package. I was elated; excited even! I was finally going to try these magical burgers.

I got into the store, grabbed a package and was hit by a wave of disappointment. The burgers were the size of sliders. There was only 2 to a package. They were $7.99! WHAT?! For real? To buy two slider sized burgers for that price they better cook themselves for crying out loud, yet I’m certain they do not.

Needless to say, I walked out of Whole Foods empty handed. I could not justify that cost. To be honest, I could just go get the black bean burgers from Lightlife. Hell, I could buy two packages for less than the Beyond Burgers and have 8 burgers!

8 > 2  is a much better cost ratio at $7.99!

Do they taste good? I don’t know, I’m sure they do though. I love Beyond Meat’s products; the grounds are amazing and the chik’n strips are untouchable. But these new burgers? Keep em! Until the price comes down I will stick to other brands. And to be honest, this has taken the wind out of my sails a bit as far as jumping on the bandwagon for the newest and coolest vegan products.

There’s so much new stuff coming out. Watching my Instagram feed I’ve been taking a virtual tour of the Natural Products Expo West. It looked like people were having tons of fun. But I’m starting to wonder, is it just more hyped up crap? I certainly hope not. If that happens these companies are going to scare away potential new vegans with the cost. The myth that vegan food is expensive has already been perpetuated, this is just going to help keep that alive.

Do you jump at the new shiny vegan product? Were you ever let down by one? For what?

addendum 7/23/2017: So um yeah, I tried em and they are worth that hype. My post is moot at this point… I buy them whenever I can and justify the cost because of the taste and pleasure they bring. I know, hypocrite: bite me!

 

#GivingTuesday 2016

11-29-2016

I’m not a super rich guy, I am cable tech for crying out loud. Silliness aside, I wanted to make an impact on four important organizations. I had a budget of $100 so I gave $25 to each of the following.

Provincetown Center For Coastal Studies

Maple Farm Sanctuary

The ACLU

Planned Parenthood

I chose each of them carefully as they all are important to me in one way or another. Coastal Studies and Maple Farm are both providing assitance to animals in need, both aquatic and land animals. Being from Cape Cod, I was raised with the awareness of how important our water and oceans are. I felt the compulsion to do at least the little bit I can.

The ACLU and Planned Parenthood do good for humans, and the fact remains that we all have to help each other. The coming four years are going to be trying at best, so support who you can, when you can and do it with love and compassion for all beings.

Were you able to make an impact today?

Thanksliving 2016

Here we are just a few days from one of the nations largest holidays, Thanksgiving. Without trying to overly politicize this post, at it’s core, Thanksgiving was a way for people to come together and put their sh*t aside and enjoy one another’s company. We can talk about how wrong the menu was from the beginning, and how Native Americans have been crapped on since that day. I’m not here to get into that because you can go on Google and find someone who has already written that article.

Meet my virtual friend Shlomo. He is a resident at Tamerlaine Farms. This year I donated to Taermaine to make sure his Thanksgiving was spent in a safe and loving environment.
Meet my virtual friend Shlomo. He is a resident at Tamerlaine Farms. This year I donated to Tamerlaine to make sure his Thanksgiving was spent in a safe and loving environment. You can sponsor a turkey too by clicking on Shlomo and picking your new friend to donate to!

I’m writing this to point out just how awesome animals are, specifically one, and why you should leave them off of your plate this thanksgiving; Turkeys! You can search all over the web for this info, again others have written this article before, but I’ve nitpicked a bit from each of them. At this bottom of this post, after the video, is links to many of those sites.

So here’s 5 fun facts about Turkeys and prove, like other animals, they are just as sentient as us and deserve to live their lives until their natural deaths. It’s not up to us when they die, it’s up to the universe to decide that stuff.

1. Turkeys are fantastic navigators and are know to remember areas they’ve previously traveled after only being their one time before. Imagine if you had that talent, we wouldn’t need GPS apps right?

2. Turkeys are fast as f*ck and can fly up to nearly 60mph! What?

3. Although they have large bodies, wild turkeys roost in trees at night to stay away from predators.

4. They may all sound the same to us, but using a variety of sounds and intonation they have different voices just like we do.

5. Lastly, like other sentient animals, Turkeys create lasting friendships and even become part of huge groups. Wild one’s, like those seen here on Cape Cod, can be found foraging with 30-40 (or more) other turkeys.

Of course, I could go all PETA and tell you how horrific their lives while they are bred and brought up to be part of Thanksgiving. I could tell you that over 45 million of them are brutally slaughtered to be part of a barbaric tradition, but again, I will leave that to PETA and others who’ve written that before.

I’m trying to keep this post on the positive though and that’s why I am reposting the video below. It’s gone viral on vegan social media groups, etc. I must have listened to it a hundred times so far, it’s truly a gem and the artist behind it, Grey, is extremely talented.

 

Here’s some other sites that have interesting facts about Turkeys.

Mercy For Animals: http://www.chooseveg.com/7-facts-that-prove-turkeys-are-too-sweet
National Audubon Society: http://www.audubon.org/news/9-fun-facts-about-turkeys
One Kind: http://www.onekind.org/education/animals_a_z/turkey