Book Review: How Not To Die

One of the quickest growing, and largest, resources available online is Nutrition Facts. It is a resource site based on the research of Dr. Michael Greger as well as an aggregate of compiled research of other medical field professionals. What makes Nutrition Facts different from a lot of the other sites is the frequency of the information that is posted and how it is presented.

We can all clamor about how much we know, or are learning about how beneficial the vegetables, fruits, legumes, herbs, etc are for us; but if we don’t have evidence to back that up its hard to quantify. What’s also difficult to pass on  and translate to others is simplified and cohesive information. It would be fantastic to have that all in one place right? It is, and it can be found in Dr Greger’s book, “How Not To Die.”

Published in 2015,  “How Not To Die” is a guide to helping prevent, and possibly reverse, some of the most common medical killers. Wouldn’t it be great to not have to deal with heart disease anymore? Wouldn’t it be absolutely amazing to not have to see family members suffer from maladies such as hypertension or diabetes? Infections? How about depression?

I’ve been listening to the audio-book version of “How Not To Die” for a couple of weeks now. I had to drive up to Vermont to check out some apartments for my daughter and wanted some good material to accompany me on the trip. I was surprised to hear Dr. Greger’s voice reading me his book. That’s a touch I appreciate though, it means he is passionate about his work and wants to present it himself. Bonus is the fact he is somewhat witty in his delivery and makes even the most complicated medical term seem understandable.

That understanding is carried through in the print version. I’ve read a bunch of books, studies, etc on plant-based research and more than most of them are written like a tech paper would be; perplexing and at times over my head.  I think that approach does not help the consumer/ reader and can make things very confusing. While still using proper medical terminology when needed, Dr. Greger breaks it down and explains the point he is trying to get across. If you want to get into that chaos, the citation that he does in this book is immense and you can spend hours upon hours reading papers he researched for the book.

Each chapter is a discourse on particular ailments and diseases and how you might go about helping yourself to either prevent or combat them. Keep in mind, this book is not a prescription and the advice of your doctor should supersede anything as he or she knows you and your overall health. That said, I know a bunch of people who are skeptical of advice they might get and it doesn’t harm anyone to arm yourself with knowledge before an appointment and ask questions. “How Not To Die” certainly gives you that insight.

There are a limited amount of recipes, but where he helps the readers most in that instance is with his “Daily Dozen.” He recommends 12 daily plant-based foods that will help assist in all general health areas. I would highly recommend “How Not To Die” to anyone who wants to gain knowledge and take control of their health. Dr. Greger shows us all that it is easy to do that and to do so without complicated foods that are laden unnecessary processed ingredients.

Have you read the book yet? How has it helped you?

 

 

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