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Book Review: The Mindful Vegan

You know how sometimes you need something to appear in your life and it shows? I’m pretty sure I’ve been inadvertently manifesting this book for the past few months. I used to be super into mindfulness and meditation but for whatever reason got away from it. I’ve been feeling it more and more lately; enter “The Mindful Vegan.”

“The Mindful Vegan” is Lani Muelrath’s new book and it’s truly a treasure.  I’m not normally one for “how to guides” or “x-amount of days” solutions type of books. I’ve read many of those that feel like a manual rather than advice. That’s not Lani and it’s certainly not “The Mindful Vegan.” It’s more of a pathway to freedom beyond just being a vegan or a mindfulness practitioner.

Lani goes through each chapter as days and makes recommendations for practice and introspection on each. Some of them are longer than others as the topic may need more attention. Of course there a few recipes in the back of the book as well, but this is not being billed as a cook book.

There are instructions on a variety of meditation techniques such as loving-kindness and walking meditation. I remember my first encounter with walking meditation and I didn’t understand it all. I was at a retreat at IMS and I remember my first night. I was drinking tea and watching zombies walk around the courtyard. By the end of the weekend I was joining them and understood walking meditation. It’s a beneficial practice and I think Lani offers it up in an understandable and approachable way.

Day Nineteen “higher ground and mind fully navigating conversations” spoke clearly and loudly for me. Her advice on how to approach veganism in a world that is averse to it (although it’s becoming less so) is an approach I wish I had witnessed before; it may have helped me embrace veganism earlier. For instance she speaks of being present in a manner I have never read before. It’s not just about being vegan, it’s about being a vegan in a kind and gracious way. Emotions carry a lot of weight when it comes to being vegan. We want to do our best to cause the least harm possible to animals and at times that can cloud the way we engage people. Lani explains how not only should you speak in a kind way but how to pay attention to your body and it’s movements. Just as your words can be harsh, so can your movements. That blew me away and will help me in the future when I speak to others about the benefits of veganism.

On a side note, I really appreciate this book as I feel the practice of mindfulness and veganism are synonymous. Even before going vegan, when I was practicing Buddhism and mindfulness, I felt like a walking contradiction and questioned many within the world of that practice. A lot of them ate meat, consumed dairy and even wore clothing made from animals. I never understood it and I think it was a big part of the reason I walked away from that world. I’m glad to know that it’s not quite the case with most, now, though. It didn’t make sense that a practice of compassion encompassed so much cruelty.

I highly recommend you taking the time to check out this book if you are open and able to try to make changes for the better. I believe with some of the practices outlined here we can all become better vegans teach the world what veganism is. It’s not about being combative; it’s about combating cruelty with kindness and compassion.

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